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Posted on 16 Jul 2020
Maternity and newborn

Have your say: Managing extremely preterm birth at 22-25 weeks’ gestation

To help give babies born extremely early the best chance of surviving, we have developed evidence-based clinical guidance to manage pregnant women and their babies.

Babies born between 22+0 to 24+6 weeks’ gestation require intensive support for months after birth and those who survive are at risk of disabilities including problems with walking, talking, thinking, seeing and hearing. 

How we manage at-risk women and extremely preterm babies varies across the state, as do outcomes for these babies.

How to provide feedback

The draft guidance is now available for feedback before Friday 14 August 2020.
After reading our draft guidance and supporting documents, take our quick survey

What does the guidance cover?

Informed by the latest evidence, our draft guidance details:

  • how to refer, transfer and manage pregnant women at risk of threatened preterm labour and birth at 22-25 weeks 
  • how to manage an extremely preterm baby immediately after birth, including ethical and clinical considerations for intensive care treatment
  • information you should give to parents to ensure they understand survival chances and the risks of long-term complications, and can take part in decisions about treatment and care options, including palliative care.

What does the guidance include? 

  • A guidance document outlining clinical considerations for care of the pregnant women and her baby, taking into account individual risk factors such as birthplace, gestational age, birth weight, sex, multiple pregnancy and exposure to antenatal corticosteroids.
  • A consensus statement around the ‘zone of parental discretion’, when parental decision-making take precedence over that of clinicians when outcomes of medical treatment are unclear.
  • Flowcharts covering how to refer, transfer and manage pregnant women at risk of extremely preterm labour and birth, and how to manage the extremely preterm baby immediately after birth.
  • Parent information sheets containing all the information clinicians should provide to parents to ensure they understand survival rates, treatment options (including palliative care), and the risks of long-term complications
     

Page last updated: 17 Jul 2020